Video Story Guidelines

Because of the universal appeal we aspire to, all video stories should be submitted in English. However, non-English accents are welcome!

The content of our crowd-sourced video stories will fall into several broad categories, including but not limited to the following. What counts the most is story quality, not production quality:

1)    Telling how you felt when you heard about a specific xenocidal event which you did not experience directly. This would preferably include a personal experience and reaction. For example, did you feel powerless, angry, fearful, insensitive, or compassionate? This could be done alone or in a small group, in the form of a personal narrative or an artistic expression — such as a poem, a song, or a visually creative video.

2)    Telling a story about your own family members who were victims of xenocidal behavior. Your story should also include how this family situation affected you personally.

3)    Similarly, telling a story about from your own family members or cultural group who were perpetrators of xenocidal behavior, or who were accused of such behavior, justly or unjustly. Your story should also include how this family situation affected you personally.

4)    Interviewing victims of xenocidal behavior, or their descendants. These could be drawn from your own family or cultural community, or from a friend or neighbor or anyone else who has directly or indirectly suffered because of xenocide.

5)    Interviewing perpetrators of xenocidal behavior, or people from cultural groups who have been accused of such behavior (justly or unjustly), or their descendants. These could be drawn from your own family or cultural community, or from a friend or neighbor or anyone else who has directly or indirectly been accused of causing others to suffer during xenocidal activities.

6)    Interviewing descendants of victims and perpetrators together. (If you decide to pursue this angle, please discuss the best approach with us before beginning such discussions, so we can guide you through this delicate process.)

7)    Expressing your reaction to one of the other video stories that has been posted. These should be about the subject matter of the other story, not a personal reaction to the storyteller. Positive or supportive reactions are preferred. Ridicule, or content that denies the reality or emotions of another storyteller, will not be deemed appropriate.

We realize that many of history’s most brutal crimes against humanity took place before the 20th century (atrocities against Native Americans, the African Slave Trade, etc.). However, we have decided to limit the scope of this project to the period since 1900, roughly corresponding to a “modern” era of such barbarity.

Our main objective is to inspire understanding of the commonalities of all such crimes, wherever they took place, as a stepping stone to preventing future xenocides. Among others, these could include xenocides committed in Armenia, Bosnia, Cambodia, China, Darfur, Libya, Nazi Germany, North Korea, Rwanda, the former Soviet Bloc, Tibet, and against indigenous peoples. Along with this understanding, we wish to show how xenocides have a ripple effect on everyone who hears about them, even those not directly affected.

The World Memory Film Project promotes healing and a sense of world community. We encourage video stories that develop this theme.